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The environment generates and selects intra-individual variation

Patricia Beldade
In this interview, she describes her experience, motivations, and her project on "phenotypic plasticity" using flies and butterflies as the main models. Developmental plasticity, i. e. phenotypic v...

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The Decoy Substrate of a Pathogen Effector and a Pseudokinase Specify Pathogen-Induced Modified- Self Recognition and Immunity in Plants

Un pivot de l'immunité
A plant pathogen effector, AvrAC, uridylylates a host kinase to promote virulence. Wang et al. find that plants have evolved a decoy substrate which upon uridylylation by AvrAC is recognize...

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Colloque Plant Protease - Oxford : 10/12 Avril 2016

Colloque Plant Protease
This meeting, supported by TULIP, will focus on the study of plant mechanisms through proteases.

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An ERC "Advanced Grant" for Michel Loreau, the first TULIP operation of attractiveness in 2012.

Michel Loreau
The European Research Council (ERC) has published the list of winners of the "Advanced grants" for experienced researchers. Michel Loreau of the CNRS in the Moulis Experimental Ecology Station, rec...

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The predator-prey power law: Biomass scaling across terrestrial and aquatic biomes

La relation entre abondances
Despite the huge diversity of ecological communities, they can have unexpected patterns in common. Hatton et al. describe a general scaling law that relates total predator and prey biomass in terre...

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Coselected genes determine adaptive variation in herbivore resistance throughout the native range of A.thaliana

Coselected genes determine adaptive variation in herbivore resistance
The “mustard oil bomb” is a major defense mechanism in the Brassicaceae, which includes crops such as canola and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants produce and store blends of amino...

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Our reason to be...

Because of an increasing world population, humanity faces multiple challenges. Among them, supplying enough food and improving land and water uses are without any doubt main priorities. The Laboratory of Excellence (Labex) TULIP is involved at a scientific level in these priorities, providing a perspective and a workforce of more than 400 scientists of various statuses, on a subject that gets more worrying each day.

The TULIP Labex develops a comprehensive theory of the interactions between living organisms in order to study their ability to adapt to environmental changes. Based on complementary approaches combining microbe, plant or animal specialists, on large scale experimental models, coupled with theoretical approaches, researchers hope to predict resource evolution and, on the long term, provide solutions to problems that will impact us shortly.

As concrete examples, the TULIP LabEx project elaborates new environmentally friendly fertilizers as well as genetically improved plant species to make them more resistant to pests and diseases.

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